Sharing, collaboration and getting it wrong

There’s nothing like a headline telling you you’ve got it wrong to make you read on. 

An article on Time.com written by a data analytics expert tells us ‘What [we] think [we] know about the Web is wrong’ – or at least when it comes to measuring ‘clicks’.  Actually most of us already know there is a massive difference between what people share and what they have actually read, or what people click and what they read.  For information professionals, who act as curators for many audiences, clicking and sharing appropriately (or “delving deep into multiple pots of data and information*” is a critical skill.

The article shares some interesting statistics:

  • 55% of those who click on a link spend 15 seconds or less reviewing the screen (lesson – grab your visitors quickly)
  • Content sharers are a small percentage of content visitors – one tweet per 100 visitors/readers

…and is worth reading for longer than 15 seconds.

On SocialMediaToday, another headline suggests we’ve got social media ‘all wrong’.  It’s a brief overview of how social media supports search engine optimisation and reminds us that customers don’t owe brands anything “They don’t have to share your content, they don’t have to interact with posts and they certainly don’t have to suggest your page to other people.”

Collaboration goes mainstream in the sharing economy

Regular readers of this blog may remember a New York Times Insight report about the ‘psychology of sharing’.  A new report has looked at ‘sharers’ in Canada, the UK and US and has organised those participating in the sharing economy into three types:

  • Neo-Sharers are those who have used sharing services such as Etsy**, Kickstarter or Airbnb at least once in the past year
  • Re-Sharers – are those who are already using well-established services (eBay etc) but are not yet ‘Neos’
  • Non-Sharers are those with intentions to use sharing services in the next year

Neo- and re-sharers constitute about 40% of the US and Canadian populations and about 50% of the UK population.

Sharers are more likely to be affluent, young and are much more likely to discover services via word of mouth, social networks or blogs than from ‘traditional’ marketing.

*Andy Tattersall writing about overload filters.

** We featured ‘the Etsy economy’ here.

 

 

Book publishing – some recent innovations

Book publishers experimenting with new models; books fighting binge drinking in Italy

Netflix models

An article on Wired.com looks at a new online fiction service called Rooster in which a book publisher adopts a magazine model to make itself more like Netflix!  The service uses a subscription based model that sends content to iPhones and iPads.  The daily chunks of content should take about 15 minutes to read and will deliver two books’ worth of content over a month.  Similarly, Waterstones in the UK has announced Read Petite – a ‘rich reading experience for time-poor readers’.

Another innovation learning from the Netflix model is Epic!  This app aims to encourage children to read by offering rewards for completing chapters or starting ‘reading marathons’.  For a monthly subscription, children have access to a library of over 2000 titles and can rate the books they have read.  The app also allows parents to monitor their children’s reading habits.

Book buying and book borrowing and struggling readers

The latest Pew report shows the link between highly engaged library users and book buying.  The report shows that ‘Library Lovers’ – the heaviest users of libraries and about 10% of the US population – are also frequent buyers of books, despite many of them experiencing a drop in income.

The UK Charity Quick Reads found that reading e-books can be particularly helpful for adults who may be struggling with their reading while 48% say e-readers  have encouraged them to read more.

Binge drinking – books to the rescue!

Sadly Neknominate, the social media drinking game, has spread around the world. In Italy a literary alternative to the game has been developed.  ‘Booknomination’ follows similar rules but instead of drinking, the nominated person must read a passage from a book over a webcam.  The initiative is on Facebook on the hashtag #booknomination.

Sources: Springwise; DigitalBookWorld; TheLocal; Pew Research Center; Publishing Perspectives; Wired.

Youth TV – ‘the need for speed’

The BBC’s youth TV channel to close; but a different story emerges in Belgium

In the UK the BBC has announced that it is to close its ‘youth-oriented’ TV channel and move the content onto its online platform the iPlayer.

Previous proposals to close down radio channels have been revised following public outcry.  In 2010 the BBC announced it wanted to close down two radio stations – 6 Music and the Asian Network.  Neither station was closed.

However, it seems unlikely that BBC Three will be saved.  The Corporation needs to make savings and this move alone could save it £50million a year. Some commentators have suggested the move is short-sighted.  The BBC is funded by licence payers and young people are the licence payers of the future.

In Belgium, VRT, the public service broadcaster has been developing digital projects to engage with its younger audience.  Rachel Bartlett, writing on Journalism.co.uk, describes how the broadcaster developed an internal ‘start-up’ to experiment with new platforms to re-engage with younger viewers.  The broadcaster has been consulting the target audience and is now developing three projects that reflect the way young people use and engage with social media:

  • a mobile video project on Instagram and Snapchat – Ninjanieuws
  • Sambal a Facebook-supported news platform
  • OpenVRT which encourages young people to collaborate with the channel via video, photography and blogging.

Key lessons – ‘the need for speed’

  • Keep videos very short
  • Embed animated gifs into articles – link out to YouTube
  • 15-second long videos helped launch Ninjaniews
  • Tell a news story on a 10-second Snapchat video
  • For the target audience (16-24) – focus on Facebook not Twitter
  • There’s no need for a homepage – Facebook drives traffic
  • Facebook also provides a home for ‘pop-up digital news products’ that respond quickly to certain trends

You can read Rachel’s full article on Journalism.co.uk.

Reputation – the major academic currency

Times Higher Education has released World Reputation Rankings 2014.

Institutional ranking is a major consideration for academics when moving jobs, for students deciding where to study and for potential partners and collaborators. The published rankings are based on over 10,000 responses from 133 countries.

US universities reign supreme

American universities take the top three slots – and take 46 of the top 100.  Harvard remains in first place, with MIT second.  Stanford University has moved into third, jumping ahead of Oxford and Cambridge Universities.  However, US State universities are slipping slightly after suffering budget cuts.

UK – cause for concern?

The UK holds ten of the top 100 places – up from nine last year but the survey suggests there is a growing gap between what it calls the London-Oxford-Cambridge triangle and the rest of the country.

Major Asian institutions make progress

Japan is the region’s best performer, with five in the top 100.  Korea’s Seoul National University has jumped from 41st to 26th.

The story in Europe

  • Two of Sweden’s institutions fell out of the top 100 leaving it with only one (Karolinska)
  • France also lost two universities from the top 100, leaving it with two (Université Paris-Sorbonne and Université Pierre et Marie Curie)
  • Germany is faring much better – it comes third after the US and UK with six universities in the top 100
  • Other European countries featuring in the top 100 are:
    • The Netherlands (Delft University of Technology ranks 42nd).  University of Amsterdam; Leiden University and Utrecht also appear in the top 100
    • Switzerland (ETH Zurich ranks 16th; Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne ranks 49th)
    • Belgium – Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

New survey open

Thomson Reuters has launched its fifth annual Academic Reputation Survey. The survey informs two key indicators of the 13 used to create the annual Times Higher Education World University Rankings, which will be released later this year.

Pizzas, selfies and swearing – new data-led research

Some interesting data-crunching research projects

A new report considers the demographics of selfies in five cities around the world: Bangkok, Berlin, Moscow, New York and Sao Paolo.

20-30,000 images from each city were analysed both automatically and then using ‘human judgement’ to consider the artistic merits of the images.  Mechanical Turk workers were asked to guess the age and gender of the people.  After that automatic face analysis created algorithmic estimates of facial positions and emotional expressions.  These tags were checked by humans.

Key findings of the report:

  • Gender differences – more women than men take selfies (but Moscow has by far the highest female/male gender gap with four and a half times as many selfies being taken by women)
  • Selfies are a young person’s pastime – the median age of a selfie taker around the world is 23.7 years.
  • Women tilt their heads more than men!
  • More people smile in Bangkok; fewer smile in Moscow

Foul language on Twitter

Researchers at Wright State University in the US analysed a random collection of 51 million tweets from 14 million users to measure the ubiquity and context of swearing on Twitter.  They identified – amongst other things – different contexts for swearing and which day of the week sees the most swearing.  The full PDF of the article can be downloaded by a link on this page – but beware.  The article uses swear words throughout and is probably not suitable for work!

Pizza and value for money

Analysis of almost 75,000 pizza prices in the US sets out to answer once and for all the tricky question of pizza size versus value for money.

Using data to predict the Oscars

BuzzFeed’s Data Scientist seems to have successfully predicted many of the winners and losers in this piece (published before the ceremony).  He correctly predicted a Best Picture win for 12 Years a Slave, a win for Matthew McConaughey and best original screenplay for Her.)

Pizzas and selfies at the Oscars

Of course pizzas and selfies were combined at this year’s Oscar ceremony when the host and several Hollywood A-listers posed for what was to become one of the most retweeted images ever – the ‘selfie to beat all selfies’.  They then ordered in pizza.

Bitcoins and gold coins

Is hiding your hoard in a rusty tin can safer?!

News stories have emerged about an American couple who have found buried treasure on their land. Initially they thought they might have found a marker for a grave, perhaps for a pet.  However, what they discovered were several tin cans full of rare 19th century American coins.  The haul is expected to fetch $10million.

This good news coin story throws into relief last year’s news of a man who threw away his ‘Bitcoin fortune’ when he disposed of an old hard drive.

The ‘cryptocurrency’ has been in the news again.  MtGox, one of the biggest Bitcoin exchanges, went offline after technical issues and ‘unusual activity’.  It had been suggested that security loopholes had led to millions of Bitcoins being stolen.  MtGox has now filed for bankruptcy.

It seems that many investors whose Bitcoins had been lodged with MtGox may have lost their investment and industry analysts are warning that Bitcoin will be subject to ‘more fraud’.  Fraudsters have already been busy according to Dell SecureWorks.  They have identified 150 different forms of malware designed to steal Bitcoins.

An article in American Banker, draws the lessons learned from the history of PayPal to predict that Bitcoin is likely to be subject to transaction and phishing fraud, identify theft and organised crime.  The authors recommend that Bitcoin learns from PayPal’s hard work in driving fraud elsewhere by focusing on security.

Of course, Bitcoin is not the only cryptocurrency as this article in ITProPortal outlines.  What makes these currencies so attractive – they work across borders and are untraceable – is what makes them risky too.  Perhaps hiding your hoard in a rusty tin can is a safer bet!

VAT on books and e-books – global survey

The International Publishers Association (IPA) and PriceWaterhouse Coopers have published the results of their latest global survey of VAT charged on books and e-books.

The research covered 51 countries, including 34 European countries (the US was not included because of the ‘complexities’ of its sales tax regime).  The report gathers current tax data and also analyses trends.

Since the last report was published, standard VAT rates around the world have been increasing and are, on average, higher in Europe than the rest of the world.  EU law also stipulates that booksellers must charge the full VAT rate for e-books while printed books are often granted discounted rates.  France and Luxembourg have reduced the rates charged on e-books and the European Commission has initiated court proceedings against them.

All of the major publishing markets in the survey (Argentina, Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK) provide for reduced VAT rates or exemptions, at least for printed books.

Overall, approximately 50% of countries surveyed continue to apply the standard (i.e. higher) VAT rate to e-books.  Overall, Denmark applies the highest VAT rate – 25% on both print and e-books.

The report concludes that the trend towards bringing e-books into special VAT regimes should be encouraged to create a level playing field for all publications, irrespective of the format.

The IPA further stated that the current regime in Europe discriminates against e-books and is “inconsistent, technophobic … and unfair.”

The full report can be downloaded here

Women in business – still under-represented at the top

“Still no progress after years of no progress”

Gender equality in politics continues to be a news story.  In the UK, the leader of the opposition stated the Prime Minister was failing women.  Four female MPs from the ruling party’s most recent intake have already made it clear they don’t want to stand again at the next election although they may not have explained exactly what it is about the way that UK politics works that makes them want to leave.  Complaints of sexism (and indeed mockery of regional accents) in the House of Commons don’t come as a surprise to any of us who watch the debates on television or from the public gallery.

We’ve covered gender quotas on this blog before when two of Germany’s political parties reached a compromise over quotas.  Similarly we’ve covered the representation of women at the top of businesses.  The latest research suggests that not much is changing or improving.

The 2013 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Board Directors finds that there has been no change at all in the representation of women at a senior level in America’s top corporations:

  • Women held only 16.9% of board seats in 2013—no change from last year
  • In both 2012 and 2013, less than one-fifth of companies had 25% or more women directors
  • 10% had no women serving on their boards.
  • Less than one-quarter of companies had three or more women directors serving together in both 2012 and 2013.

In the UK, Spencer Stuart’s UK Board Index 2013 (available via this link) found that women account for just under 18% of the total directors in the UK’s top 150 companies – although this figure at least is climbing.  In the last year, 38% of all newly appointed directors are women.

The latest figures for Europe (the EU-27 countries) show that women make up 16% of board members.  The highest representations are in Finland (29.1%) and Latvia (29%).  Although the number of companies with no women on the board has decreased from 35% in 2010 to 23% in 2013, there are still very few companies with women at the very top as CEOs. or Chair.  All countries are falling far short of the EU’s 2020 40% representation objective.

Europe: competitiveness and innovation

Europe has a reputation as being unfriendly to innovators – but is this fact or perception?

International business school INSEAD set out to uncover the truth.  First, as part of INSEAD’s European Competitive Initiative, it surveyed 1300 business leaders around the world to find out what they felt about the current state of innovation and entrepreneurship in Europe.  Staggeringly, only 2% of the respondents disagreed with the statement “Europe’s innovation is hampered by a lack of culture of innovation and entrepreneurship”.

However, this was not because of a lack of quality people.  Most of those surveyed lay the blame firmly with European governments and institutions.  This negative view was held particularly strongly by non-Europeans.  When asked how they felt about the future of Europe, high percentages expressed concern or worry:

  • 83% of Latin American respondents
  • 74% of BRIC country respondents
  • 65% Asian country respondents
  • 60% of African respondents

That survey deals with perceptions of innovation in Europe.  But what does the data say?  In fact surveys and data from INSEAD and other institutions including the World Economic Forum paint a different picture.

The Global Innovation Index places six European countries in the top ten (in descending order Switzerland, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Netherlands and the UK).  In fact, when the 2011 scores are aggregated across regions, Europe scores equally with North America.

Europe scores well in The World Economic Forum Global Information Technology Report 2013 – particularly the Nordic countries and the UK.

Europe certainly has some work to do to change the perception of it as being unfriendly to innovators and entrepreneurs.

INSEAD’s European Competitiveness Initiative hopes to help business leaders in Europe by disseminating research, best practice and lessons learned.

 

The news behind a paywall – a success story from the Netherlands

The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are often cited as paywall success stories.  But how are smaller news outlets making paywalls succeed?

In the Netherlands, a news site called De Correspondent set a world record in crowdfunded journalism.

In September 2013 it took just eight days for 15,000 donors to raise over one million Euros.  The site has over 25,000 ‘members’, each of whom pays 5 Euros a month to access the site.

De Correspondent has succeeded because it has brought a fresh approach to digital only journalism.  Elements of its ‘manifesto’ challenge traditional aspects of news journalism.

  • Commercial model – the site is advertisement-free and has a profit ceiling of 5%.  They want to ‘sell content to readers, not readers to advertisers’.
  • Not ‘readers’ but ‘participants’.  The site was created to enable much more than reader comment.  Instead, it has a focus on building relationships between people and acknowledges the expertise of the community.  ‘Dialogue not ‘monologue’
  • A focus on themes and connections – the site moves beyond traditional news categories such as ‘business’ or ‘international’ and instead aims to make sense of a globalised world
  • Like-minded people – not target audiences
  • An emphasis on fact-checking – and emotion

The power of community has been used to fund the site, and to develop its content.  It is also the way in which the word is spread.  De Correspondent limits its advertising to promoting some articles via Facebook.  All other marketing is conducted by the members who share with their friends and followers.

Further reading:  De Correspondent website; GigaOm