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Wearable technology and apps

Google Glass may have been garnering many column inches recently but wearable technology and apps are still relatively niche products.  18% of the 4,000 adults in the US and UK who participated in research (conducted by Rackspace and the Centre for Creative and Social Technology at Goldsmiths, University of London), reported using a wearable app – mainly for fitness or sleep monitoring.  In other research, (this time by Forrester) only 6% of online adults in the US report using a wearable device to monitor their sports performance.

However, those that were using such wearable apps were happy with their performance.  According to the Rackspace research, 82% of US respondents and 71% of UK respondents felt that the apps had made a positive impact on their lives.

The same research also suggests privacy issues were a concern for roughly one half of the respondents, although a significant minority expressed no concerns about some data and information sharing.  This included wearing devices that linked directly with healthcare providers.  Privacy concerns arise mainly from the fact that wearable apps are directly linked to cloud services.

Another piece of research suggests that the potential global market for smart glasses could reach 10 million units by 2016.  Growth will depend on what developers are making available.  This will included augmented reality apps that can easily integrate into other tools.

The future of wearables

In the late 1990s I heard a technologies futurist speak about the future of consumer goods. He predicted ‘intelligent shampoo bottles’ which collected usage data to provide feedback to the manufacturer.  The bottles would also know how often we were shampooing our hair and would send you a message when you needed to buy more. The speaker was predicting the internet of things and the power of data, sharable via portable devices.

In the same way that apps helped grow the adoption of smartphones, apps are key to the successful future of wearable technology.  Third party developers will enhance the performance of the technology.  Big name developers such as Twitter, Facebook and the New York Times are working to develop apps for Google Glass. Apple too will be seeking to replicate the success of iPhone aps and will work with its community of developers to do so.

We can look forward to contact lenses with Google Glass features; smart watches; smart textiles and much more.  Cosnumers are already predicting uses for wearables which go beyond the existing fitness applications.  44% of those who participated in Forrester research said they’d be interested in devices whch would unlock their homes and cars.  30% said they’d like a device to make media recommendations based on mood.  29% said they’d be interested in devices that tracked their children!

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Multiscreen and mobile

A global study of 15,000 mobile web users in 14 countries* explored how consumers are interacting with visual content across a variety of devices.  The report outlines opportunities for businesses and marketers to connect with consumers in new ways.

Key findings:

  • 62% of mobile web users engage in multiscreen activities while viewing TV
  • 48% use social media
  • 46% use instant messaging
  • 30% play games or listen to music
  • 18% search for additional information about the products seen on TV
  • News, comedy, sports and reality programmes generated the most multiscreen time

Lessons from marketers

  • Incentivise engagement – reward viewers for viewing content
  • Gamify – engage with users across multiscreen platforms
  • Generate social conversation with hashtags
  • Create transmedia opportunities
  • Know your audience – understand on which channels/tools they are most active and encourage engagement
  • Simplicity – make calls to action uncomplicated
  • Relevance – increase engagement with appropriate messages at the appropriate time
  • Re-engage – social conversations should not be one-offs

* 15,000 mobile users from Australia, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Kenya, Korea, New Zealand, Nigeria, South Africa, Singapore, UK, US were surveyed by InMobi.

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BYOD – latest trends and predictions

Two new reports on the impact of BYOD on business and individuals have appeared this month.

BYOD strategies enable employees to use their own devices to access data and enterprise applications. Although security issues still cause concern for many organisations, BYOD can improve employee satisfaction, encourage innovation and reduce organisational costs.

Gartner’s latest report on the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) phenomenon reveals continued growth in the trend.  Gartner surveyed global Chief Information Officers asking them about their attitudes to the provision of mobile devices for employees.

Key findings 

  • BYOD most prevalent in medium-sized organisations (2,500–5000 employees)
  • US companies are twice as likely as European companies to allow BYOD
  • By 2016 38% of companies will not provide mobile devices to employees
  • Full employee reimbursement for costs will decline

With the likely decrease of organisations subsidising the purchase of devices, Gartner says that organisations need to ensure employees are given guidelines on the best possible devices for work.  When it comes to phones, employers should not subsidise the purchase of the device but should contribute to the service plan.

Employee time savings

Meanwhile, Cisco has published a report on the value of BYOD to companies in six countries (Brazil, China, Germany, India, the UK and the US).  Of the companies surveyed, 89% are already allowing BYOD.  According to Cisco, employees estimate they are saving an average of 37 minutes of productive work a week, although the figures for different countries vary wildly (81 minutes per week for the US; 4 minutes per week in Germany).

Making it work

Organisations need to ensure their workforce has the right skills, backed up by mobile and BYOD company strategies and guidelines.

See original Gartner press release.  See the Cisco report.

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Cities of opportunity – what makes a city ‘great’?

What makes a city great?  How can cities thrive economically and yet remain liveable?

PwC and the Partnership for New York City have published the latest edition of Cities of Opportunity, a report which analyses the performance of 27 of the world’s cities against ten broad social, economic and technological indicators.  As well as analysing the current situation, the report also looks forward to 2025 to consider future scenarios and key success factors.

The cities analysed in the report currently account for 8% of world GDP but are home to only 2.5% of the world population.

Healthy growth in a city relies on a combination of ‘quality of life’ factors (good education opportunities; healthcare; safety and housing) combined with strong business and solid infrastructure.

The ten indicators used by PwC:

  • City gateway
  • Cost
  • Demographics and liveability
  • Economic clout
  • Ease of doing business
  • Health, safety and security
  • Intellectual capital and innovation
  • Sustainability and the natural environment
  • Technology readiness
  • Transportation and infrastructure

Intellectual capital and innovation

Innovation generates both social and economic growth.  In order to measure each city’s performance a number of factors are considered and scored to create a league table.  These factors include average class size, maths, science skills attainment, literacy rates and percentage of population who receive a higher education.

Also included are:

  • Intellectual property protection (Singapore scores top points)
  • Research performance at top universities (London rates highest – and three Asian cities appear in the top ten)
  • Libraries with public access (Stockholm scores highest)

The key measures of ‘Technology readiness’ include:

  • Internet access in schools and Digital economy score (Stockholm is top in both of these)
  • Broadband quality
  • Software development

The report features case studies on a number of cities and is available for download here.

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Children and apps

Apps for and used by children have been in the news recently.

In the UK a five year old managed to run up a bill of £1,710.43 in paid for add-ons for a game which he had downloaded free from Apple’s app store.  He was using his parent’s iPad (with permission) to download and play Zombie v Ninja.  The UK’s Office of Fair Trading (OFT) is to investigate the ‘free app/paid for features’ marketplace.

More than two thirds of children and teenagers in the UK own a smart device.  According to a survey conducted in the UK by OnePoll, 36% of children aged 11-16 download mobile apps without their parents’ permission.  40% of boys admitted to having done this, compared with 31% of girls.

The survey also found that youngsters can increase their families’ monthly charge by an average of £34.  The highest bills were generated by eight-year olds!  The researchers estimate that parents are incurring approximately £30 million in ‘unauthorised’ purchases.

In Australia the Cartoon Network researched the media habits of 1800 children and discovered that game playing and video watching  (rather than social media) are their main internet pastimes.  They research also found that:

  • 48% of Australian homes have a tablet device
  • 30% of children use tablets to access the internet
  • 69% of children aged 4-14 use apps , and use an average of 7 per month
  • 32% drop in game console usage since previous survey in 2011

(These findings are echoed by a recent report from the US showing how teenagers are leaving ‘traditional’ social media sites in favour of alternatives.)

Developing apps for children – “tappable apps”

At a recent conference for developers of educational apps for children, three key challenges were identified:

  • Working within appropriate privacy guidelines
  • The challenge of obtaining feedback from ‘non-verbal’ young children
  • The challenge of identifying compelling content for young people

The conclusion – make the apps as “tappable, responsive, and interruptive” as possible.

Best content for children in Europe

The EC has just launched the second European Award for Best Content for Kids,  looking for ‘positive content initiatives’ across the region.

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Cyber security in the UK

Effective cyber security is good for business, according to the UK’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), which has published its 2013 Information Security Breaches Survey.  The report presents the findings from over 1000 respondents across small, medium and large firms in a range of sectors.  The figures show that companies in the UK have experienced the highest ever number of reported security breaches and the costs to firms are also at an all-time high.  The average cost to a large firm of its worst security breach is reported to be between £450k and £850k.  For small firms, the figure ranges between £35k and £65k.

The increased use of cloud computing, mobile devices and social networks can increase risk (14% of large organisations reported a security breach via a social network).  Ongoing changes in the business environment can also lead to uncertainty about who is responsible for information and data ‘ownership’.  This is particularly true in large organisations where 33% of respondents reported that such responsibilities were ‘unclear’.

Most of the respondents reported that they have written information security policies, yet 34% report that employee understanding is poor.  Training levels remain low, despite evidence that training and awareness can significantly reduce the impact of security breaches.

Threats from outside – and within

The BIS states that cyber-attacks have grown ‘in frequency and intensity’ over the last year.  These include hacktivism attacks, phishing, identity fraud and denial of service attacks.  Companies are not just subject to external threats.  Staff related breaches may be both deliberate and inadvertent and can range from accidentally sending emails to the wrong recipients or disgruntled employees taking business critical data with them when they leave the company.

Key findings

  • 87% of small firms experienced a security breach last year
  • 93% of large companies experienced a security breach
  • 36% of the worst security breaches were caused by inadvertent human error
  • 10% of the worst security breaches were caused by deliberate misuse of systems by staff
  • 23% of respondents haven’t carried out any form of security risk assessment
  • 9% of large organisations had a security or data breach in the last year involving smartphones or tablets
  • 4% of respondents had a security or data breach in the last year relating to one of their cloud computing services
  • 92% of respondents expect to spend at least the same on security next year (and 47% expect to spend more)

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Multi-screen trends

We are living in an increasingly connected and mobile world.  It is critical that we understand how our customers and potential customers are using multiple devices so that we can ensure they are receiving the right content where and when it is most relevant.

Microsoft Advertising surveyed global consumers and identified four types of multi-screen behaviour:

  • Content grazing – the most common multi-screen behaviour, with 68% of those surveyed reporting that they view two screens of unrelated content simultaneously (e.g. reading emails while watching television)
  • Investigative spider-webbing - 57% reported that they view related content on two screens simultaneously
  • Quantum journeys – 46% of consumers report beginning their content journeys on one device and continuing on another
  • Social spider-webbing – 39% of people reported they share and connect with two or more devices – for example watching a TV show and using a second device to tweet, comment or update their status

In the UK Fast Web Media has looked at the TV adverts of 50 brands to explore how many are encouraging multi-screening.  Econsultancy.com summarises the key findings:

  • 48% of the brands included URLs in their adverts
  • 20% mentioned Twitter or hashtags
  • 16% mentioned Facebook ‘likes’
  • 6% sought follow up on YouTube

Extending engagement

Google undertook research exploring the ways in which UK consumers were multi-screening the London Olympics.  They found that 33% of people in the UK were following the Olympics on more than one screen. Those that were using more than one device were averaging many more minutes per day of viewing than single screen viewers – they were watching while they were out of the home and on the move.

The research also found that the Olympics was a stimulus for many consumers to try something new on their smart devices, including live streaming and joining social networks to ‘talk’ about events.  Almost one in three people who attended Olympic events were looking at online content while they were there.  They conclude that stadiums and venues are becoming as ‘porous’ as retail outlets with people sourcing relevant information to enhance their experience.

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Connected Europe – the latest consumer figures

Forrester has released a European edition of its US consumers and technology benchmark report.  The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2012, Europe explores changes in consumer behaviour in the EU5 countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK).

Key findings

  • Almost 75% of European adults go online at least once a month
  • Over half of them own two or more connected devices
  • 22% report they are online when they are outdoors
  • 14% are online in their cars
  • 58% of online Europeans have a Facebook account

National differences

Of the five countries studied, the UK has the highest percentage (83%) of consumers going online regularly and also has the highest average online shopping spend (10% have used a shopping app in the last month).  52% own a smartphone and 12% own a tablet device and 18% of them have a Twitter account

Germany has the largest online audience in Europe (over 46 million online consumer), with just under three-quarters ordering services or products online in the last three months.  Only 5% have a Twitter account

In France consumers are the least likely to own multiple connected devices and the least likely to own a tablet (7%), smartphone (42%) or other connected device.  7% have a Twitter account

In Italy 58% of adults go online each month.

In Spain 69% of adults go online monthly

Although the online populations are smaller in Italy and Spain, they are relatively active.  Two thirds of online consumers in each country have a Facebook account and they are more likely to be ‘creators’ or ‘critics’ of content rather than passive participants.

The full report is available from Forrester.

Behaving badly on social media

This week the UK’s first ever ‘youth police and crime commissioner’ resigned after less than a week in the post.

Paris Brown, who is 17, had published a number of tweets which critics condemned as racist and homophobic.  She had also alluded to underage drinking and drug taking. The tweets were at least two years old.

This is a high profile example proving that we should all (not just young people) think carefully about what we share on social media. Irresponsible use can have a serious impact on employability. Following her resignation, Brown made the following statement:

I have fallen into the trap of behaving with bravado on social networking sites. I hope this may stand as a learning experience for many other young people.

An interesting aspect of this case is that Brown’s employer, Kent Police, failed to vet a potential employee’s social media profile and history.  A recent report suggests that 47% of employers check social media profiles of applicants immediately after they received their applications.   Kent Police’s spokesperson said:

We used Kent police’s vetting procedures, which do not normally involve scrutiny of social networks for this grade of post.

Perhaps these procedures will be reviewed now.

Instagram arrests in Sweden

Meanwhile in Sweden two teenage girls are to be charged in relation to a riot last year.    The girls are alleged to have used Instagram to shame other teenagers by publishing photographs and posting insults and comments about their sexual activities.  Hundreds of school pupils had gathered at a high school in an attempt to identify the Instagram account owner and a riot ensued.

Twitter and advertising

Twitter has been enhancing its advertising services as it continues to increase its revenues.  Improvements include a new advertising API and an upgraded dashboard which provides more performance data to advertisers.

Twitter’s ‘business’ site has also been enhanced with new content to help businesses use Twitter to better engage with their audiences.  The website provides some basic and advanced tips for using the tool for marketing purposes and also features some excellent case studies from a wide range of organisations.  This content features lessons learned which can be searched by company size, sector, product and – interestingly – by campaign goals.

Twitter success stories

What is the main goal or purpose of your Twitter campaign?  The case studies on the Twitter site are grouped by client goals, including: drive sales, increase the number of followers; educate and inform; brand awareness; product launch and increase engagement.  Once you are clear about the main goal of any campaign, then you can begin to focus on the best tactics.  Once again, the site enables you to search by approach, including direct response and partnership models.

Each of the case studies features measurement data including numbers of new customers/ orders/ follows and ROI.  If you have colleagues who may be looking for more information about the value of Twitter as a marketing or engagement tool, they may find the content of value.

Meanwhile, eMarketer has revised (upwards) its predicted advertising earnings for Twitter, forecasting that the social network will earn almost $1billion in 2014.

Mobile drives growth

  • 53% of Twitter’s advertising revenues will come from mobile advertising in 2013
  • 2013 mobile advertising revenue will total $309million (2012 total = $138million)
  • By 2015 Twitter’s advertising revenues will be $1.3billion, with over 60% coming from mobile
  • 83% of advertising revenue in 2013 will come from the US (down from 90% in 2012)

Source: eMarketer.  Further reading on TechCrunch.